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Neumont College of Computer Science was founded in Salt Lake City, Utah in 2003, to fill the growing national demand for industry-ready technology professionals by offering bachelor’s degree in three years that immerses students in a rigorous, project-based curriculum. This blog serves as a platform to publish and share, news, reviews, and stories from Utah's best kept tech secret. 

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Neumont College of Computer Sciences's official blogs shares the stories of our students, alumni, faculty, and staff to illustrate the Neumont experience. 

 

Filtering by Category: Events

Neumont Commencement Address Looks to Tech Future in Utah and Beyond

Neumont College of Computer Science

Neumont College of Computer Science honored graduates at the 2018 Commencement Ceremony on Friday, August 31 at The Capitol Theatre in Salt Lake City. John Knotwell, CEO and president of the Utah Technology Council, provided the keynote address. Neumont President Aaron Reed, Ed.D. also spoke briefly. You can watch the full ceremony at the YouTube link below. 

Knotwell, a 12-year veteran in Utah's growing tech community spoke of the value of listening, sharing that, "…true listening shows that you value those people around you. It shows that you are invested in them as people, and that you, as a colleague, coworker, boss, or friend, want them to succeed. And a world where we all wish one another success is the only way to find success ourselves. It's how we build each other up, how we build up our organizations, how we have faith in the future."

 Valedictorian Mary Shultz (Computer Science) and Salutatorians Ben Goff (Computer Science) and Justin Furtado (Software & Game Development) stand to receive their diplomas. 

Valedictorian Mary Shultz (Computer Science) and Salutatorians Ben Goff (Computer Science) and Justin Furtado (Software & Game Development) stand to receive their diplomas. 

Making a plug for Utah's tech future as well, Knotwell shared, "We have over 6,500 tech firms in Utah. We are the fastest growing in the country, adding job after job after job to every listing site that has ever existed," noting that, "There will never be a moment where opportunity is not calling you. The only real impact that you can make, in your career or in your life, is your choice," and invited Neumont graduates to stay local.

 Bashaa'ir Abdul-Qasim's (Information Systems) family greets the graduate during a reception after the ceremony. 

Bashaa'ir Abdul-Qasim's (Information Systems) family greets the graduate during a reception after the ceremony. 

"Make the choice to stay," he implored. "Make this community your home. Explore opportunities and the mountains. Invest your time here finding the balance that we all want in work and in life."

After noting three key life lessons gleaned from his time in tech and higher education, Dr. Reed closed his remarks reminding graduates, "Today was the day you joined an elite tech workforce --  the one-and-a-half percent that are chiefly responsible for the future of America's economy and national security," referencing remarks earlier where he noted that while 30 percent of Americans have bachelors degrees, only 3 percent of all awarded degrees go to computer science, and only 1.5 percent of people in the United States work in computer science.

 2018 Commencement Ceremony Keynote Speaker John Knotwell, Utah Technology Council president and CEO, reminds graduates that the best way to find success is to help others. 

2018 Commencement Ceremony Keynote Speaker John Knotwell, Utah Technology Council president and CEO, reminds graduates that the best way to find success is to help others. 

But "even more exclusively than that," Reed said, "remember that today is the day you joined a growing army of tech giants that are part of a family of Neumont alumni."

2018 Project Showcase: Learning By Doing

Neumont College of Computer Science

Each year, students at Neumont College of Computer Science gather at the end of the winter quarter to demonstrate the projects they've developed in the last 10 weeks in a friendly competition. In 2018, students competed in gaming, non-gaming, Capstone, and Enterprise Project categories. 

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During Project Showcase, current students, alums, staff, faculty, and visitors, play games, test tools, try new websites, and see demonstrations of student-made software development projects at work. Each project was completed in the 10 weeks of the current quarter either as part of regular course work or as students worked on their own. Students may compete individually or in small teams, depending on the scope of the project. 

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Highlights from this years Project Showcase included a stellar showing in the non-gaming category. 

  • The overall audience favorite went to a first-year student team for their tool "The DnD Cartographer." This remarkable product allows players to better track their maps and character sheets for "Dungeons & Dragons."
  • The winner of the non-gaming category was a small team for their tool "Foodie's Formula."
  • The runner up created "Spine Express." This tool allows developers to more quickly and easily work with the JS library. 
 "The DnD Cartographer" team accepts their pies and awards after winning the overall audience favorite for their tool. 

"The DnD Cartographer" team accepts their pies and awards after winning the overall audience favorite for their tool. 

Other remarkable projects included an augmented reality mobile app for astronomy, a tool for converting black and white film to color using artificial intelligence, and a tool to connect writers and publishers.

 Maciej Smusz accepts his award after winning the faculty favorite for his tool, "Colorize," that uses artificial intelligence to convert black and white film to color. 

Maciej Smusz accepts his award after winning the faculty favorite for his tool, "Colorize," that uses artificial intelligence to convert black and white film to color. 

Students with the most impressive projects are invited to demonstrate their work just a few weeks later at FReX on April 6, 2018 so future students and their families can see project-based learning in action before tackling their own engineering project. Project Showcase Prime is just one of several awesome activities that take place during our Accepted Student Weekend. If you're thinking about attending Neumont this fall, register right away at accepted.neumont.edu for this incredible event. 

Ready to find out if project-based learning is right for you? Complete your Application for Admission now at www.neumont.edu/apply

The best way to learn to code is to code

Neumont College of Computer Science

At Neumont College of Computer Science, we're all about technology. And, we firmly believe the best way to master tech is to get hands-on experience from day one. That's why all students are automatically enrolled in Intro to Computer Science, a Java-based programming course in their first quarter. 

(If you haven't tried out programming before, check out this free Java course from Codecademy to get a sense of what software development is like.)

Intro to CS is just the beginning of your tech education at Neumont.  From there, you'll dive into other languages, tools, and frameworks with increasing emphasis on the tools needed for your chosen major: computer science, software & game development, web design & development, information systems, and technology management. 

But it isn't all programming courses. We offer general education and electives too, so you can go hiking, wireframe an app, and write an essay on Tolkien all in the same day. Although theory is important, our curriculum is developed in partnership with leaders of the tech industry and emphasizes project-based courses where students learn how to apply what they've learned in a real world setting while developing communication, collaboration, and creativity to solve problems. When you graduate from Neumont, you'll have the knowledge, skills, and experience needed to launch your tech career. 

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One of the best examples of our project-based curriculum is Project Showcase. At this STEM fair, students demonstrate their projects to future students, alums, industry partners, faculty, and staff. 

You're invited to  join us on Friday,  March 9, any time from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. to see what students have developed. All visitors are encouraged to vote for their favorite projects in gaming, non-gaming, Capstone, and Enterprise project categories. The awards ceremony will be at 3:45 p.m. Neumont's campus is at 143 South Main Street in Salt Lake City. Visitors are encouraged to take TRAX (City Center) or to park at City Creek Center.

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If you'd like to drop by during Project Showcase, please let us know you're visiting by calling 888-638-6668 or email events@neumont.edu. All visitors are asked to check in at the front desk.  

Can't wait to start learning software development? Complete your Application for Admission at www.neumont.edu/apply before the deadline on Monday, March 26 and receive your admission and scholarship decision by Tuesday, April 10. If you have any questions or need assistance, please call the Office of Admissions at 888-638-6668 or email admissions@neumont.edu

Neumont College of Computer Science VP Academic Operations Tim Clark Named Utah Association for Career and Technical Education Business Leader of the Year

Neumont College of Computer Science

Neumont College of Computer Science congratulates Tim Clark on being named the Utah Association for Career and Technical Education Business Leader of the Year. Clark currently serves as Neumont’s Vice President of Academic Operations and was presented the award in conjunction with the Utah ACTE Mid-Winter Conference, held at Jordan High School in Sandy on Friday, February 2, 2018.

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Utah ACTE is the largest professional association serving educators in the career and technical education profession in the state of Utah.

Denise Abbott, Utah ACTE awards chair, said Clark was “chosen for his dedication and commitment to teachers and students of career and technical education. We are impressed with his efforts to increase and enhance career and technical education by providing such excellent leadership and service to the community.”

Clark has spent 14 years as a professional in the IT world. He has held a range of positions in the IT chain of command from technical support to software architect up to CIO for an eight-campus university located in Southeast Asia.

Clark is also a Neumont alumnus, graduating as valedictorian from the institution’s first cohort in 2006. He has been a Neumont instructor as well as program chair for the Bachelor's Degree of Science in Web Design & Development.

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“Tim represents all the best parts of Neumont,” President Aaron Reed, Ed.D., explained. “He has a passion for computer science education, a love of teaching and a desire to share that knowledge and passion with others. We are honored to have him as an integral part of our leadership at Neumont, and congratulate him for being honored as Utah ACTE’s Business Leader of the Year.”

For more than three years, Clark has spent time outside of his Neumont responsibilities teaching at Utah ACTE’s summer and winter conferences, and this year recruited additional members of Neumont’s leadership and staff to help train career and technical educators; including Neumont President Aaron Reed, Ed.D.; Ben Fletcher, vice president of information systems and program chair of the Bachelor of Science in Information Systems; Tom Beatty, program chair of the Bachelor of Science in Web Design & Development; and Josh Krebs, computer science instructor. Neumont’s participation accounts for 25% of the Utah ACTE tech training sessions at the winter conference. 

Capstone Project Invitational Winners "Homestead" and "Ivory"

Neumont University

Neumont College of Computer Science is pleased to announce the 2018 winners of its annual Capstone Project Invitational event are “Homestead” and “Ivory.”

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“Homestead” by Ryan Stead received the Alumni Choice Award. The judging panel noted the project’s technical depth and potential in the marketplace as reasons for choosing it. The project is a virtual reality interior design tool that allows users to explore different colors, lighting, furniture, décor and more before redesigning their space. The computer science student moved to Salt Lake City from Gloversville, New York to attend Neumont.

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“Ivory” by Benjamin Goff was given the Industry Partner Choice Award for its technical depth and potential for success. The project is a piano tutorial that aims to help users teach themselves to play the piano. The user interface uses MIDI music files and a virtual keyboard to allow anyone with a USB or Bluetooth enabled keyboard to learn. Goff, who is originally from Rexburg, Idaho, is a senior majoring in computer science at Neumont.

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“There was some tough competition,” said Director of Academics Jeremiah Harrison. “All of these projects were amazing, we’re so proud of all of our students. These students today really went above and beyond to show what they can do.” Harrison hosted the event on Friday, January 12 at the Salt Lake City Public Library. A livestream of the event is available on Neumont’s Facebook page.

Other projects presented at the event included:

  • “3D Mesh Generator” by Justin Furtado: This tool allows game developers and designers to quickly create varied models by altering small details automatically.
  • “Angela’s Bakery” by Sophie Wargo: A custom website that allows a user to place an order for a cake using a 3D visualization tool.
  • “MCraft Tutorials” by Baret Woods: A website where users can create, share and show off the things they create in Minecraft.
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Capstone Projects are 10-week projects students design and develop on their own to show they’re ready to tackle the challenges of their senior year. Each year, five students with the best projects as determined by faculty are invited to demonstrate their work to a judging panel of alumni and tech industry partners.

Neumont is unparalleled in its approach to academics— uniting business, technology, and creativity to educate tomorrow’s tech elite. With a focus on project-based learning, students are immersed in a tech environment from day one to earn a degree in technology that will help launch their careers. Learn more about Neumont at www.neumont.edu.

An Easter egg hunt, project presentations, faculty reception, and more FReX nonsense

Neumont College of Computer Science

A complete wrap up to all things FReX last weekend as the Class of 2020 got to know Neumont Unviersity and Salt Lake CIty. 

Neubies and their guests arrived to a light breakfast and checked in at a hotel in downtown Salt Lake City. They listened to presentations from Chief Operating and Academic Officer, Aaron Reed, Director of Academics Tim Clark, Director of Corporate Relations Teresa Zundel, Career Services Manager Britta Nelson, and alumnus and Computer Science Instructor Josh Krebs.

Presenters shares why they chose to work at Neumont, highlighted stats and data about the future of computer science in the United States, and explained that Neumont is the best choice for a degree in technology because of our project-based curriculum devleoped in partnership with the tech industry, hands-on approach, and real-world experience. Not to mention, a dedicated Career Services team to help students find jobs before graduation.

The presentations were followed by lunch as a panel of current students and alumni tackled questions on everything from why they chose Neumont to their day-to-day life to their careers. A huge thank you to each of them for taking time out of their day to share their Neumont story. Chris, Furqan, Mary, and Melissa were happy to share their experiences as students and alumni. 

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After lunch, attendees and their guests were invited to Project Showcase Prime at Neumont's campus at 143 South Main Street in Salt Lake City. At Prime, students with the best projects from Showcase are invited to present once more. These dedicated students showed off apps, games, and software they had developed independently and in small groups to prove their skills in Java, C#, and more. 

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During Project Showcase Prime, guests were invited to tour a student apartment in the Tower Suites, chat with faculty, and search for Easter eggs in honor of the holiday weekend. 

As if all of that wasn't enough, accepted students were invited to get to know current students with a night of gaming on campus. (After a break for dinner at a nearby restaurant of the guests' choosing.) Parents were invited to get to know each other at a small mixer event at the Little America's Lucky H Bar and Grille. 

Students and visitors competed in tournaments for Super Smash Bros and Overwatch. They also had a choice of games to play including Cards Against Humanity, Pathfinder, Resident Evil 7, and more. 

Thank you for visiting! We hope you had as much fun as we did!

Neumont University's Keynote Speaker Commencement Address by Dr. Ludmil B. Alexandrov

Neumont University

On Wednesday, March 15, 2017, Neumont University Alumnus and Oppenheimer Fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory Dr. Ludmil B. Alexandrov gave the speech below at the Commencement Ceremony celebrating the Class of 2017.

Dear graduates, dear members of the faculty and staff, dear parents, family, and loved ones – we have gathered today to share and to celebrate an important, dare I say, a milestone achievement.

To those of you graduating on this day, I offer my most sincere congratulations for successfully completing this stage of your formal education. I know that the past few years at Neumont have not been easy. I am sure that for many of you there have been numerous sleepless nights trying to finish a homework assignment, or attempting to meet a project deadline, or preparing for an important presentation. Now, it is the time to relax! It is the time to celebrate! You made it – you have finished your degree and moved to that ever elusive next level. Give yourself a round of applause! You really deserve it!

It is really an honor to be back at Neumont and to address this newly minted group of alumni. I have to confess that when Aaron Reed called me and invited me to present this commencement address, I was deeply flattered and I was completely overwhelmed. Without any hesitation, and with little thought about the task at hand, I accepted this honor. As time passed and the date for the speech came closer, I started realizing that I do not really know what to talk to you about. Of course, I did the most natural thing for a computer scientist – I went on the internet and I googled “how to write a great commencement speech”. As I learned from Google, the goal of a commencement speech is to plant a seed that will inspire the graduates towards a better path forward. This is indeed a daunting task and I am not quite sure whether I will be able to live up to this expectation.

In fact, I decided that the best approach is to tell you a story. To tell you a story of a fellow Neumont graduate. To tell you my story. And by telling you my story, I hope that I will be able to show you two things. First, that your education at Neumont will be invaluable in your future jobs, whatever these jobs might be and wherever these jobs might take you. And, second, I want to challenge you to not be afraid to follow your dreams, no matter how crazy these dreams might be and no matter where these dreams might take you.

It was almost exactly 10 years ago when I was in your position. I have just completed my education at Neumont and I was looking forward to going to my first serious job. I remember looking at a piece of paper. That same piece of paper many of you got today – your degree, your diploma. I also remember reflecting on my decision to come to Neumont for my bachelor’s degree.

At the time of my graduation, I did not know whether I have made the right choice. Whether the education at Neumont has been sufficient for paving the way towards a successful future career. Now, a decade later, I have absolutely no doubt. I know for sure. The foundation that Neumont gave me was not only sufficient to make me an exceptional employee of a fortune 500 company but this education also gave me the necessary courage and vision to apply what I have learned at Neumont into completely different fields. Indeed, I was able to take the project-oriented mentality and use it in all parts of my life including in my education and my scientific research.

I can still clearly remember my decision to become a student at Neumont University. I remember receiving a brochure in the mail, looking at it, and thinking – this place seems great for a person like me.

And what do I mean by a person like me? I have been passionate about programming since a very early age and I am sure that many of you share this early adoration for computers. My passion was first expressed in regards to playing computer games-a habit that still persists to this very day. As timed passed, I found it much more fascinating to program computers and to create my own games and my own tools. I deeply enjoyed programming and savored every moment of it.

During my time in high school, in all honesty, I was super nerdy.

At that time, I constantly participated in competitions for mathematics and informatics. Not only did I compete but I also deeply enjoyed being part of these competitions! When it came time to decide where to go for college, I knew that I wanted to go to a place of like-minded people. A place full with “nerds just like me”. A place that could educate me in cutting edge technologies. I understood the value of knowing mathematics, theory, and algorithms but I was more thirsty for learning hands-on technology skills necessary to solve the problems relevant today rather than solving the problems of yesterday.

I do clearly recall my very first day at Neumont’s campus – everyone around me was excited about various aspects of computer science and everyone was eager to learn. Indeed, it was a great place; it was almost a perfect place.

During my years at Neumont, its students, its staff, and its administration became like a family for me. The numerous hours spent developing projects brought us, the student at that time, together creating friendships that have endured the test of time. The projects we all worked on were not simply college assignments, rather, these projects became voyages that we took on together as teams, in some cases, these projects even became battles that we fought together.

The staff and administration of Neumont were ever present and always there to help and guide us throughout these journeys, making everyone’s time at the University truly unforgettable.

A few months after graduating from Neumont, I started my very first job as a business technology consultant at Deloitte Consulting. I was justifiably worried, as I did not know what would be expected from my first job. After my first week on the job, I was not worried any more. Not even the slightest bit.

The job as a consultant at Deloitte was so very similar to the many projects that I have done at Neumont and I knew exactly what I should do and when I should do it. In fact, I recall thinking that one of my enterprise projects was much more complicated than my current job as a consultant. To my surprise, the situation was rather different with my colleagues at Deloitte who came from other colleges. Many of them were indeed quite smart and they have completed their education at top universities across the country. However, what they lacked was the exposure to the rigorous project-based education and the type of thinking that Neumont has given me, and has also given you.

Most of my Deloitte colleagues were experiencing projects for the very first time and, naturally, they were struggling with this first encounter. After the first six months on the job, my manager came to me, he looked me in eye, and told me, “Ludmil, you really know what you are doing. You are operating on the next level we keep talking about. I think we should promote you as soon as possible." 

Indeed, I got this first promotion by the end of that fiscal year. In contrast, it took several years for most people from other universities to achieve this career step since they first needed to learn the rules of the game. The rules that I knew and you know from your time at Neumont. I should confess that this was not only my experience; many of my friends and classmates from Neumont were also excelling at their jobs with remarkable pace: getting promoted faster and receiving significant salary raises.

Indeed, what you probably do not realize at this moment but you will almost surely know within a few years is that your education at Neumont has provided you the necessary road map and experience to steer through the turbulent waters of corporate America. The completion of this rigorous education has given you both the necessary knowledge and the know-how to shine in your new jobs and to be more successful than you have ever imagined.

But going back to my story. After working for some time as a consultant, I discovered that I am extremely passionate about understanding scientific problems and, more specifically, about solving biological conundrums. It was an unexpected personal discovery and, in fact, it was a scary discovery. I felt valued and appreciated in my current job as a consultant. I also felt that my career was moving forward and I was being well compensated and promoted. In contrast, I was unsure whether I will be any good as a scientist, especially in a new field like biology. At that time, I remember thinking that while there is a good chance that I will fail as a scientist, if I do not try to be one, I will regret it for the rest of my life. Indeed, in parallel with my day job as a consultant, I started using my computational skills and training at Neumont to help scientists at Harvard with the analysis of large biological data sets. As time progressed, I found myself enjoying biological research more and more and I eventually I applied for a master’s program in Computational Biology at the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom.

I was very blunt in my application essay – I wrote that I have limited knowledge in regards to biology and that I have a strong project-based computational education from Neumont. To my surprise, I was not only accepted at Cambridge but I was also given full funding to support my master and subsequently my doctorate studies.

I would later learn that my diverse academic background and education was an essential reason to get these scholarships. Nevertheless, going to a place like Cambridge was intimidating. Cambridge is a university that is more that 800 years old, it is older than most countries that currently exist. Cambridge has educated a big proportion of Nobel prizes winner and it has effectively created most of the modern fields of biology, physics, economics, and literature. To my dismay, completing my master's, and later my Ph.D., was much easier than I expected. Without realizing, the hands-on learning at Neumont has prepared me to educate myself on my own.

I was not reliant on lectures, rather, I looked at each class as a project and I developed a set of tools around it. For example, instead of simply readying and comprehending lectures in neuroscience, I developed various programs simulating neural networks, synaptic plasticity, single-neuron models, and many others. The ability to learn on my own and build projects from any topic allowed me to successfully complete my graduate studies and to develop a thread of science which has been novel and unique and has set the standard for future work in an important area of cancer research.

Ten years ago, I graduated from Neumont University and during the past decade I managed to go from a successful consultant to a respected scientist who is currently a co-investigator on one of the largest cancer research projects in the world. Reflecting on the past ten years, I can clearly appreciate that the education and foundation, which I received at Neumont, have been essential for my personal and my professional development. You may or you may not realize it today, but the education you have received will allow you to shoot for the stars. Ten years from now, many of you will be on the top of the world and I hope that you will be able to look back and to grasp the fundamental importance of completing this very first step. Of completing your education at Neumont!

Again, congratulations! Congratulations on finishing this phase of your life. I wish you all the best in your future endeavors and do not be afraid to change the world.

Thank you and good luck!

2016 Freshman Orientation at Neumont University

Neumont University

Freshman Orientation for the Class of 2019 is almost here! And we couldn't be more excited to welcome our newest cohort to Salt Lake City! 

Students and their parent(s)/guardian(s) will begin their Neumont adventure will Housing Move-in Day on Friday, September 16.

The next morning on Saturday, September 17, we'll host a series of short presentations at the Little America Hotel. New students are required to this Orientation Kickoff event and encouraged to ask questions. While families get their questions answered by a panel of staff, freshmen will pick up their new laptop, books, and ID badge at the university's 143 South Main Street campus. 

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The orienting will then continue with a Housing Orientation for all students living in Neumont University sponsored housing around downtown Salt Lake City. All freshmen are required to live in student housing unless an exemption is granted by the Dean of Students. 

Finally, freshmen will settle in with a week of Freshman Seminar. Monday through Friday, students will take a class designed to introduce them to Neumont's hands-on approach to learning, programming, each other, and Salt Lake City. The course consists of lectures, team-based projects, panels, and more. 

After a full week of getting acquainted with all things Neumont, classes will start for all students on Monday, September 26. We'll see you then!

Summer of Programming Kicks Off with Kid Code Con 2016

Neumont University

Ten years ago, Utah Geek Events kicked off their first coding camp at Neumont University’s South Jordan campus. There were 50 adults that attended the session. A decade later, more than 700 attendees were taking part in another historic event: Kid Code Con at Neumont’s campus in downtown Salt Lake City, officially kicking off the Summer of Programming at the university. 

The event offerings included classes in Scratch, JavaScript, and Gamemaker for the eight to 18 crowd; as well as more basic classes to help build a foundation for future coders starting at just five years old. There was also a special parent session focused on better understanding Computer Science and how best to support young coders.

“As a mother of young girls, I thought it was wonderful to get an opportunity for them to get a chance to dig deeper into the STEM area,” said Jamie Moncur, who attended with her three daughters, ages three to eight. 

Sabrena Suite-Mangum, a Neumont employee said she was also elated to participate in Kids Code Con with her seven-year old son Holden.

“He started getting particularly interested in programming and computer science during last year’s Hour of Code. He kept asking when he would get attend a summer coding camp, but there’s not much offered for kids under age eight. The event was great way to keep fueling his interest in programming. I’m so grateful we attended.” 
 Holden Mangum, age 7 at the Electronics 101 session. "I never knew so much went into getting an LED light to work!" he later shared.  

Holden Mangum, age 7 at the Electronics 101 session. "I never knew so much went into getting an LED light to work!" he later shared.  

Holden said he thought it was important to learn to code “so I can make video games when I grow up.” His mom recognizes it's the language of the future, and a skill set to be nurtured early. He attended the Lego session and the Electronics 101 class, lead by Copper Hills High Junior Cassandra Ivie, who has been recognized on a local and national level for her contributions robotics and STEM education For this session, participants used breadboard kits to show how circuits and LED lights work.

Eight-year old Cyrus Cheney, son of Neumont  UniversityEvent Coordinator Emily Cheney said, “I like that it was educational and fun. It’s important to do things like Kid Con because we learn different strategies to do different things.” 

His mother Emily added: "We had a fantastic time at Kid Con! I wish I had the opportunity to learn coding basics as a child." 

For the older participants, one of the event highlights was the Virtual Reality session. Pat Wright, President of Utah Geek Events and head of Kid Code Con said that more than 70 people chose to attend the morning session alone. One key factor was the Microst HoloLens. Only 1,000 have been made to date, and it lived up to the hype.

students and kids at Kids Con

Wright said that while Utah Geek Events' Adult coding camps have expanded well beyond the capacity at Neumont, that the downtown spot was perfect for Kid Code Con.

“We have a long standing relationship with Neumont,” he explained. “It’s a great school. The project-based learning is what sets Neumont apart from every other university in the state. I tell parents, 'For my dollar, I’m most likely sending my daughter to Neumont because her best chance of getting hired is here.' ”

Utah Geek Events will host another Kid Code Con at Neumont University in August. Watch the news story on KUTV for more information.